China Readings for March 18th

  • Goldman Should Be Barred From Returning More Capital, Bair Says – Bloomberg – Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (GS) should be prohibited from boosting its dividend or repurchasing stock because Federal Reserve stress tests showed the investment bank is too leveraged, according to former regulator Sheila Bair.
    The leverage ratios of four financial firms dropped below 4 percent under the stressed scenario, according to test results the Fed released this week. Two of those firms, Citigroup Inc. (C) and MetLife Inc. (MET), were prohibited from raising dividends or repurchasing shares. The central bank approved the capital plans of two others, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley.
  • 小学课本封面被质疑植入医院妇科广告(图)_新闻中心_新浪网
  • Some Chinese Surrender U.S. Stock Listings – Barrons.com – Smart young Chinese executives once flocked to the U.S. in search of capital, credibility and, through listings on the Nasdaq and the New York Stock Exchange, a critical mass of knowledgeable investors.

    That's no longer necessarily true, at least when it comes to listings. Spooked by stricter regulations, swooning valuations and probing analysts, some Chinese companies are delisting their stocks in the U.S. and making the long trek home. Some are even considering relisting in the People's Republic or Hong Kong, lured by looser regulation and a flood of liquidity.

  • Three Industry Experts Reflect on Challenges in China’s Senior Housing Market | Asia Healthcare Blog
  • American capitalism triumphs over Chinese capitalism at the March 13 Slate/Intelligence Squared debate – Slate Magazine
  • 优酷土豆合并幕后之谜:投资人否认资本操控_互联网_科技时代_新浪网
  • Fireside Chat with Yue-Sai Kan: The Most Recognized Woman and Brand Name in China
  • Chinese Fish for Meaning in U.S. Carp Rampage: Adam Minter – Bloomberg – Sometimes, Chinese netizens pay more attention to a U.S. news story than Americans do. President Barack Obama’s Feb. 23 decision to allocate $51.5 million to eradicate an invasive species known as the Asian carp is a prime example.
    Outside of the Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins, news of this carp-control strategy barely registered with the U.S. public. But on March 6, it hit China and, like a jazz trio riffing for an hour on just a few notes, microbloggers took to the minor news topic with gusto, using it to explore issues ranging from corrupt civil servants to U.S. sovereign debt. Soon it even had its own hash tag, roughly translated as #Asian Carp on an American Rampage#.
  • The power of microblogs: Zombie followers and fake re-tweets | The Economist – IN THE year 15AD, during the short-lived Xin dynasty, a rumour spread that a yellow dragon, a symbol of the emperor, had inauspiciously crashed into a temple in the mountains of central China and died. Ten thousand people rushed to the site. The emperor Wang Mang, aggrieved by such seditious gossip, ordered arrests and interrogations to quash the rumour, but never found the source. He was dethroned and killed eight years later, and Han-dynasty rule was restored.

    The next ruler, Emperor Guangwu, took a different approach, studying rumours as a barometer of public sentiment, according to a recent book “Rumours in the Han Dynasty” by Lu Zongli, a historian. Guangwu’s government compiled a “Rumours Report”, cataloguing people’s complaints about local officials, and making assessments that were passed to the emperor. The early Eastern Han dynasty became known for officials who were less corrupt and more attuned to the people.

  • My Secret to Getting Sober – WSJ.com
  • Daring Fireball Linked List: ‘This American Life’ Isn’t the Only Outfit With Retractions Due – Daisey now admits this is false. This is what The Times chose to run on their op-ed page the day after Steve Jobs died.

    UPDATE, 30 MINUTES LATER: The Times has now removed the above paragraph from the piece, and prepended this editor’s note:

    Editor’s Note: Questions have been raised about the truth of a paragraph in the original version of this article that purported to talk about conditions at Apple’s factory in China. That paragraph has been removed from this version of the article.

    This isn’t over. “Questions” haven’t just been raised — Daisey has admitted it was a complete fabrication. Sort of a bogus move to pull the paragraph without saying what the paragraph claimed.

  • An acclaimed Apple critic made up the details | Marketplace from American Public Media
  • How to Kill China’s ‘Carrier-Killer’ Missile: Jam, Spoof and Shoot | Danger Room | Wired.com – China has developed a missile that would turn an aircraft carrier into a two-billion-dollar hulk of twisted metal, flame, and dead sailors. Publicly, the U.S. Navy downplays its importance. Privately, the sailors are working out several different options to kill it before it kills them.

    Adm. Jonathan Greenert, the Navy’s top officer, explained to reporters during a Friday breakfast meeting that the Navy has ways of exploiting some of the DF-21D missile’s formidable technical capabilities, even before opening fire and praying.

  • Fiance of S’porean Stanchart detainee says Wuxi police tried to shut him up: Shanghaiist – The fiance of Wu Yidian Eden, the Singaporean associate director at Standard Chartered's private banking business who was recently detained, has written an account of his time in Wuxi yesterday, where he tried to see his wife-to-be. Wu's parents were allowed to meet with her, but he was not. Local police, as it turns out, are unhappy that he has been talking to the press and writing about the case on his blog, and they want to shut him up.
  • JasonDavidTan — The visit – I believe that I have the luxury of being able to speak out because I am a US citizen.  If I were a Chinese citizen doing something similar I am positive I would be detained immediately and thrown in some corner somewhere I couldn’t cause any trouble for these police who have nothing better to do than to hold an innocent person hostage from the people that care about her. Finally, it came back around to me again and I said I had nothing left to discuss and finally left.  Basically a huge waste of time. 

    I’m realizing afterward that they had tried 3 ways to get me to stop talking to the media and posting on the internet.  1. Allowing me to see Eden in exchange for shutting up.  2. Trying to get Eden to convince me to stop.  3.  Trying to get the family to convince me to stop. 

    I’ll stop when they release Eden.

  • Obama camp attacks Mitt on Bain’s China investment – POLITICO.com – The Obama campaign is seizing on today's New York Times story on Bain Capital's investments in China to accuse Mitt Romney of "utter hypocrisy" when it comes to his finances and Chinese human rights.

    In a statement, Deputy Campaign Manager Stephanie Cutter accused Romney of being "less than forthcoming" about his personal stake in the Chinese economy, given the report that Bain has significant holdings in a company helping expand the Chinese government's video surveillance programs.

  • Senior Analyst, China – International Crisis Group – Reporting to the North East Asia Project Director/China Adviser, and working closely with other research and advocacy staff in the organisation, the successful candidate will develop and enhance Crisis Group’s research capabilities as they relate to the role of China in conflict prevention and resolution issues in the region and around the world. The successful candidate will research and produce reports on Chinese policy on political, social and security issues in countries in the region and around the world. The position requires strong field research, analysis, drafting and editing skills, and an understanding of international conflict dynamics. While the analyst will be based in Beijing, travel within the region and internationally will be required, sometimes under demanding conditions; the ability to work under tight deadlines in a team as well as independently is essential.
  • Toxic Treats from China Killing US Dogs, Say Pet Owners – ABC News
  • Is Mitt Romney Profiting Off Chinese Surveillance? | ThinkProgress – if Romney profited from Bain’s ties to Youku and Uniview Technologies, it’s worth examining how the GOP frontrunner’s tough-talk on China can happily coexist with Bain’s investments in companies that have constructed business models around Chinese human rights abuses and intellectual property theft.
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